Potato and Onion Frittata

I recently decided to take a good look at the search terms that drive traffic to my blog.  Some of the top terms are common, everyday-type foods (like enchiladas and stuffed peppers), but I was shocked by how many people were out there searching for frittata recipes.  (Maybe they’re more common than I thought?)  It then occurred to me that while I used to make frittatas so often that it was almost an obsession, I haven’t posted a frittata on this site in ages.  (Since October 14 of last year, to be exact!)  I turned to my breakfast recipe spreadsheet to find a quick and easy option with inexpensive ingredients, and the Potato and Onion Frittata recipe from the January/February 2006 issue of Everyday Food fit the bill perfectly.

First, I prepped my veggies.  I peeled, halved, and thinly sliced 1 large onion and 1 8-ounce baking potato.  In a medium (10-inch) nonstick broilerproof skillet, I heated 1 tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat.  I added the onion, potato, and 1/2 teaspoon of crumbled dried rosemary, seasoned with coarse salt and ground pepper, and tossed everything to combine.

I covered the skillet with its lid and cooked the veggies for 10 minutes.  Next, I uncovered the skillet and cooked the mixture, tossing occasionally, until the onion and potato were tender (about 5 minutes).

While the potato and onion were cooking, I whisked together 5 large eggs, 5 large egg whites, 1/2 cup of whole flat-leaf parsley leaves, 3/4 teaspoon of coarse salt, and 1/4 teaspoon of ground pepper in a medium bowl.  (I used a melamine bowl with a spout since it’s easier for pouring.)

At this point, I started heating the broiler so it would be ready for the last step; I also made sure a rack was positioned in the upper third of the oven.

I added another tablespoon of olive oil to the potato-onion mixture in the skillet and poured in the egg mixture.  I cooked the frittata over medium-low heat (use low or medium-low, depending on how hot your stove gets), lifting the mixture a few times around the edges to let the egg flow underneath.  Once the frittata was almost set in the center (12 minutes for me, 10 minutes according to the recipe), I put the frittata under the broiler until it was set and golden brown (3 minutes).  The photograph shows the frittata still in the skillet, but it released very easily; I just ran a clean spatula around the edges and slid it out onto a plate for cutting and serving.

Potato and Onion Frittata

After all this frittata-less time, it was sure nice to have one for dinner.  This one was a bit thinner than what I’m accustomed to; it was almost like a thick egg pancake.  It was really delicious, though, with the tender potato, charred onion, and fresh herbs.  This frittata is especially healthy (only 5 Weight Watchers points for an entire quarter of the dish) because there’s no cheese, but I didn’t think it was lacking in the flavor department at all.

The only thing I would do differently next time is that I would stir the potatoes and onions halfway through the covered cooking time.  I’m a huge fan of charred bits and I think they add a lot of flavor, but letting the potatoes and onions sit undisturbed in that hot oil for ten whole minutes was almost too much.  If charred bits make your day (Christopher, I’m talking to you!), though, give the recipe a whirl as is.

Recipe link: Potato and Onion Frittata

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