Posts Tagged 'Breakfast'



Mexican Potato Omelet

January was a month of dates with friends and lots of naughty, naughty food. Croque Madame with loaded potato soup (heavy cream!) at The Squeaky Bean? Yes, please!  Massive plate of fries (half bacon mac and cheese, half buffalo) at Jonesy’s Eat Bar?  Mmmm.  Catered dinner from Le Central at the sorority reunion?  You bet. (And that’s really only half the damage!)

We had lots of fun, but I’m going to focus on healthy cooking for the next couple of weeks to balance things out a bit.  I made something wonderful last night – Mexican Potato Omelet from the April/May 2006 issue of Body + Soul – that was fresh, well-balanced, and delicious.

Here’s the recipe:

Mexican Potato Omelet
Serves 4
Prep time: 20 min. | Total time: 50 min.

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 red-skinned potato (6 ounces), well scrubbed, halved, and thinly sliced
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 scallions, thinly sliced
Coarse salt and ground pepper
8 large eggs
1 1/4 cups plum tomatoes, coarsely chopped (about 2 tomatoes)
1/2 cup shredded pepper jack cheese (2 ounces)
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
1/2 teaspoon fresh lime juice

Method:
Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a 10-inch broiler-proof skillet over medium-low heat. Add potato, cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown and tender, about 10 minutes. Stir in garlic and all but 1 tablespoon of the scallions; season with salt and pepper and cook 1 minute.

In a large bowl, beat eggs until well combined. Add 1/4 cup each tomato and cheese; stir to combine. Add remaining oil to pan, and pour egg mixture over the potatoes.

Preheat broiler with rack 4 inches from the heat. Meanwhile, cook eggs on the stove top, lifting the edges to allow uncooked egg to flow underneath, until the center is almost set, 8 to 10 minutes. Sprinkle remaining 1/4 cup cheese over the top, then broil in the oven until set, about 2 minutes.

In a small bowl, make a salsa by combining the remaining tomatoes, scallions, cilantro, and lime juice. Run a metal spatula around the edges of the pan and slide the omelette onto a platter. Serve cut into wedges with salsa.

Source: Body + Soul, April/May 2006

Mexican Potato Omelet

This wasn’t knock-your-socks-off amazing, but it was a solid, tasty weeknight meal.  I especially loved the way the lime in the salsa brought out the flavors in the omelet.  I didn’t modify anything exactly, but I did need an extra 2 minutes to cook the potatoes and I went the full 10 minutes to cook the eggs on the stove top.  I also seasoned the eggs and the salsa separately (in addition to the potatoes when the garlic and scallions were added).  I served the omelet with seasoned black beans.  Yummy!

Recipe link: Mexican Potato Omelet

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Daring Bakers’ Challenge: Christmas Stollen

The 2010 December Daring Bakers’ challenge was hosted by Penny of Sweet Sadie’s Baking. She chose to challenge Daring Bakers to make stollen. She adapted a friend’s family recipe and combined it with information from friends, techniques from Peter Reinhart’s book………and Martha Stewart’s demonstration.

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I briefly contemplated skipping this challenge because of Christmas chaos, and I just barely managed to bake off my stollen loaves before my husband and I hopped on an airplane home, but I am so glad I participated this month.  My husband enjoys my day-to-day cooking and he definitely lets me know, but he has never heaped praise on me the way he did with this stollen.  He loves it.  I stashed the majority of the loaf I cut for the photos below in my carry-on bag and hauled it back to Nebraska; my family loved it as well.  I guess my dad tried to go to a European bakery to buy some Czech Christmas bread on the 23rd or 24th and they were completely cleaned out at 10 a.m.; this bread was similar and satisfying enough to save the day.

Here are my notes and variations from the challenge:

  • After reading Audax’s posts in the forums, I used bread flour instead of all-purpose flour.
  • I used orange extract when we had the choice between orange and lemon.
  • I made my own candied orange peel using the recipe provided.  (It will be my next blog post!)
  • I did not use any maraschino cherries because I didn’t want to risk turning my bread pink.
  • I used slivered almonds instead of sliced almonds because that’s what I had in my pantry.
  • From there, I followed the recipe exactly as written except that I formed my dough into two wreaths instead of one.  I saw how large the wreaths were in the forum posts and figured that my tiny 24-inch oven wouldn’t be able to handle one.  I baked each half-recipe wreath for 36 minutes, rotating the baking sheet from front to back halfway through.  The major upside of baking two wreaths?  We came home to one waiting for us in the refrigerator.

Baked Stollen

Sugared Stollen

Sliced Stollen

This bread was so tasty!  It wasn’t like fruitcake at all.  The bread texture reminded me a lot of cinnamon rolls; it was moist and chewy, though the crust was pleasantly crisp.  The powdered sugar and butter coating was heavenly.  My bread had a distinct orange flavor since I used orange extract and all candied orange peel (instead of candied mixed peel), and I would make it this way again next time.  I could have gone for a bit more fruit and nuts in the bread, but I appreciated that it wasn’t totally packed.

My family enjoyed this recipe so much that I’ll be adding it to our permanent Christmas collection.  Thanks for a new family tradition and a great challenge, Penny!

Recipe link: Christmas Stollen

Pumpkin Doughnut Muffins

I get so incredibly excited each time I find a recipe that is so fantastic I know I’ll make it, quite literally, for life.  Today’s recipe – Pumpkin Doughnut Muffins from the November 2010 issue of Everyday Food – is one of those recipes.

The recipe isn’t on the Everyday Food site yet, so here it is:

Pumpkin Doughnut Muffins
Makes 12
Active time: 20 min. | Total time: 1 hr.

Batter Ingredients:
10 tablespoons (1 1/4 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature, plus more for pan
3 cups all-purpose flour (spooned and leveled), plus more for pan
2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon coarse salt
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1/3 cup buttermilk
1 1/4 cups pure pumpkin puree (from a 15-ounce can)
3/4 cup light brown sugar
2 large eggs

Sugar Coating Ingredients:
3/4 cup granulated sugar
2 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted

Method:
Preheat oven to 350°F.  Butter and flour 12 standard muffin cups.  Make batter: In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, nutmeg, and allspice.  In a small bowl, whisk together buttermilk and pumpkin purée. In a large bowl using an electric mixer, beat butter and brown sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a time, scraping down bowl as needed.  With mixer on low, add flour mixture in three additions, alternating with two additions pumpkin mixture, and beat to combine.

Spoon 1/3 cup batter into each muffin cup and bake until a toothpick inserted in center of a muffin comes out clean, 30 minutes.  Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, combine granulated sugar and cinnamon.  Let muffins cool 10 minutes in pan on a wire rack.  Working with one at a time, brush all over with butter, then toss to coat in sugar mixture.  Let muffins cool completely on wire rack.  (Store in an airtight container, up to 1 day.)

Note: Freeze muffins up to 3 months.  Reheat in a 350°F oven, then coat in butter and sugar.

High-altitude adjustments: I’m not sure I actually needed to make these changes since this was the first time I made this recipe, but I went with my high-altitude baker’s intuition.  I’m so pleased with the results that I will make these changes again next time.

  • I added 1 tablespoon of flour to the batter (3 cups plus 1 tablespoon total).
  • I cut the baking powder by 1/4 teaspoon (2 1/4 teaspoons total).
  • I used a scant 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda instead of a full 1/4 teaspoon.

Pumpkin Doughnut Muffins

Pumpkin Doughnut Muffins Interior

The interior of the muffin had a mild pumpkin flavor and wasn’t overly sweet.  The texture was light, airy, and moist with a beautiful crumb.  They were a bit more cake-like than a traditional muffin, I think.  The cinnamon-sugar coating was absolutely divine, and the amount of sugar and spice on the outside was a perfect complement to the inside of the muffin.  In short, they were amazing.  I have visions of feeding these to houseguests, lounging with them on Sunday mornings, and bringing them to brunches year after year.

I swear, these are the best muffins I’ve ever made.  In support of this theory, another doctor at my husband’s office lightheartedly suggested he might marry me after sampling them.  They’re THAT good.  Give them a try!

TIPS:  When I need to bring an amount of butter to room temperature quickly and I don’t want to risk overdoing it in the microwave, I thinly slice the butter and let it sit on a cutting board.  In five minutes or so, it’s ready to go.  Also, I always use room-temperature eggs when I bake.  To bring eggs to room temperature quickly, I put them in a container of lukewarm water for three to five minutes.

Daring Bakers’ Challenge: Doughnuts

The October 2010 Daring Bakers’ challenge was hosted by Lori of Butter Me Up. Lori chose to challenge DBers to make doughnuts. She used several sources for her recipes including Alton Brown, Nancy Silverton, Kate Neumann and Epicurious.
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I can’t say I eat many doughnuts these days, though I have glorious memories of midnight college Krispy Kreme runs.  Hot doughnuts practically melting in my mouth?  Good heaven.

So when I saw this challenge, I was convinced that it would be complete ecstasy. Homemade is always better than commercial, right?

Meh.

I used the Alton Brown yeast doughnut recipe for this challenge.  While I didn’t have any of the challenges I anticipated (overly sticky dough, sputtering oil, burning my first few batches), I just didn’t like the flavor of the doughnuts all that much.  After reading Audax Artifex‘s post in the forums, I increased the sugar from 1/4 cup to 1/3 cup; I’m not sure that even 1/2 cup would have been enough.  They had a really lovely texture (very light and crisp on the outside, airy inside, not too greasy), but I thought they were pretty bland.  I used a powdered sugar and cream glaze to dress them up, but even that didn’t improve them much for me.  This was almost a relief, actually, because I wasn’t tempted to eat them all!

Glazed Doughnuts

I’m glad to have the experience of making doughnuts and I may try again, but I’ll use a different recipe.  Thanks for organizing the challenge, Lori!

Recipe link: Yeast Doughnuts

Update: Ham and Cheese Buttermilk Breakfast Muffins

Forgive me for another update and another breakfast post.  I’ve been entertaining so much for the past two months that I’ve been returning to my “tried and true” recipes…  It seems I learn something new each time, though.

Today’s recipe – Ham and Cheese Buttermilk Breakfast Muffins – is one I first tried back in October of 2008.  It’s written for sea level but works beautifully at high altitude, probably because the muffins are made with buttermilk.  (I’ve had a lot of success here in Denver with baked goods that incorporate buttermilk; buttermilk’s high acidity helps batters set more quickly, which can eliminate the “flat tire” phenomenon that occurs so often with high-altitude baking.)  Anyway, they were a big hit the first time around because they’re easy, delicious, and a great make-ahead option for company.

Back in 2008, I placed the batter directly in a greased muffin pan and had just enough for 12 muffins.  This time, I decided to try paper liners.  I couldn’t fit as much batter into the paper liners as I could with the bare muffin cups; each muffin was a scant 1/4 cup instead of a heaping 1/4 cup, so the baking time was reduced from 28 minutes to 22 minutes.

Since the smaller muffins resulted in leftover batter, I decided to make some mini muffins as well.  Each one was made up of 2 tablespoons of batter (one scoop using my cookie scoop) and the muffins baked for 15 minutes.

Ham and Cheese Buttermilk Breakfast Muffins

They tasted as fantastic as ever, and now I have three different “formats” for the muffins depending on how I plan to serve them.  Here’s the recipe in case you’d like to try them:

Ham and Cheese Buttermilk Breakfast Muffins
Makes 12 muffins without liners, 18 muffins with liners, or 36 mini muffins

Ingredients:
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder (use 2 1/4 teaspoons at high altitude)
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon salt (can up this to 1/2 teaspoon if you use unsalted butter)
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 large eggs (I bring them to room temperature)
1 1/3 cups buttermilk
2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1 cup thinly sliced scallions (about 1 bunch)
1 cup diced ham (6 ounces)
1 cup grated extra-sharp cheddar cheese
1/2 cup finely diced red bell pepper

Method:
Heat the oven to 400°F.  Coat a 12-cup muffin pan or 12- or 24-cup mini muffin pan with cooking spray or line it with muffin cups.  (The mini muffins will require multiple batches.)

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, pepper, salt, and cayenne pepper.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, buttermilk, oil, and butter.  Stir in the scallions, ham, cheese, and bell pepper.

Add the wet ingredients to the dry and use a rubber spatula to mix until just moistened.  Scoop the batter into the prepared pan (heaping 1/4 cup each for unlined 12-cup muffin pan, scant 1/4 cup each for lined 12-cup muffin pan, 2 tablespoons each for mini muffin pan).

Bake the muffins until the tops are browned (at high altitude, about 28 minutes for unlined 12-cup muffin pan, 22 minutes for lined 12-cup muffin pan, 15 minutes for mini muffin pan).  Let the muffins cool in the pan for 15 minutes then loosen the edges with a knife (if necessary) and transfer the muffins to a cooling rack. Serve warm.

To store, individually wrap the muffins in plastic and refrigerate for up to 3 days or freeze for up to a month.  To reheat, remove the plastic wrap, cover the muffin in a paper towel, and microwave on high for 30 to 60 seconds (15 – 20 seconds for mini muffins).

Source: Jim Romanoff, The Associated Press

High Altitude Update: Breakfast Casserole

I was recently hit with a major influx of bread.  My dad was in town last week and my uncle was joining us for dinner at the house, so I had purchased a package of white bakery buns for barbecued chicken sandwiches.  An hour before dinner, I got a fantastic Foodbuzz-related delivery: three packages of rolls – one white, one wheat, one sesame hoagie – courtesy of Nature’s Pride.  My uncle voted for the wheat rolls that evening and I ended up freezing the white and sesame rolls, but my original package of white buns was left sitting in the pantry.

For the past couple of months, I’ve been making a concerted effort to keep my groceries bills down and to de-clutter my pantry by using what I have.  What’s one of the best ways to use up extra bread?  Egg casserole, baby.  My mom has a recipe that has been a longstanding family favorite, but I hadn’t tried it since Dallas.  With so many houseguests coming in the next several weeks, I figured it was time to add this one to my high-altitude arsenal.

I followed the recipe exactly as written except that I used some of the Mexican-blend cheese I’ve had in the freezer since the Ocho de Mayo party.  (If anyone wants to come over for quesadillas, let me know.  I still have four pounds of it!)  I also used all of the optional ingredients.  I baked the casserole for the full 60 minutes and let it stand for 10 minutes before cutting into it.

Breakfast Casserole

This is such a tasty recipe and it absolutely reminds me of being back home.  When I wrote my original post I swore I’d only use challah bread for egg dishes from that point on, but the hamburger buns did an amazing job of soaking up the egg mixture.  (The casserole sat for 30 minutes at room temperature before I baked it; I didn’t refrigerate it at all this time.)    I was a bit concerned that it might not quite be done at the hour mark because the center looked slightly juicy; I used my instant-read thermometer to take its temperature, though, and it had reached a more-than-okay 180°F.  When I cut it after 10 minutes of resting time, it wasn’t runny at all.  (I might still give it an extra 5 minutes of baking time next time just because.)

If you’re looking for a creamy, cheesy, comforting crowd pleaser, this is your recipe. Give it a try!

Link to original post and recipe: Breakfast Casserole

Bell Pepper Egg-In-A-Hole

In the interest of tightening up my grocery budget just a bit, I recently went on a quest to see if Costco’s meat really was cheaper than my regular grocery store. The verdict?  Not so much.  However, I did discover that Costco had killer deals on several items of produce.  I was able to get 12 large Braeburn apples for only $4.49 (I’m used to paying around $1.99 per pound unless I make the special trip to Sunflower Market; $4.49 usually translates into about 5 apples), 12 ounces of raspberries for $2.99 (usually anywhere from $2.99 to $4.99 for only 6 ounces!), and a bag of 6 gorgeous red peppers for $5.79 ($1.99 each on a normal day, $0.99 when on sale).  I’m not sure that Costco would be worth a special trip since it’s 15 minutes from my house, but I’m definitely going to visit the produce area during every Costco trip from here on out.

Today’s recipe centers around the peppers from my produce score.  I have a special place in my heart for Egg-In-A-Hole; my uncle made if for me for breakfast during my Colorado visits when I was growing up (except he called it Egg Toast).  I always get the warm fuzzies when someone makes me breakfast, and his version was always so delicious.  I saw this particular version – Bell Pepper Egg-In-A-Hole – in this month’s issue of Everyday Food, and I just had to give it a shot.

To prep for the meal, I sliced one red bell pepper (any color is fine) into four 1/2-inch-thick rings and grated 2 teaspoons of Parmesan cheese.  In a large nonstick skillet, I heated 1 teaspoon of olive oil over medium-high heat.  I added the bell pepper rings to the skillet (evenly spaced) and cracked 1 egg into the middle of each ring.  I seasoned the eggs with coarse salt and ground pepper and cooked until the egg whites were mostly set (about 3 minutes).  Next, I gently flipped each egg (with the pepper, of course) and cooked for an additional 90 seconds.  (The recipe says 1 minute for over easy; we tend to like our eggs over medium.  Cook them longer if you like your yolks cooked through.  If you gently touch the yolk area with your finger, you should be able to sense how cooked the yolk is by how firm to the touch it is.)  I sprinkled each egg with 1/2 teaspoon of the Parmesan and placed each one on a slice of unbuttered wheat toast.

In a separate bowl, I tossed 8 cups of mixed salad greens with 2 teaspoons of olive oil (the recipe said to use 1 teaspoon, but I didn’t think it was enough), seasoned the greens with coarse salt and ground pepper, and then tossed again.  I served the salad alongside the eggs.

Bell Pepper Egg-In-A-Hole

This was such a fun, delicious twist on the traditional Egg-In-A-Hole recipe.  Two added bonuses: it’s an incredibly light meal (only 4 Weight Watchers points, even with the extra teaspoon of oil in the salad) and it only took 10 minutes to prepare. 10 minutes!  It’s love.  I was also shocked by how delicious the salad was since it had next to nothing on it.  Flavorful greens and an appropriate amount of seasoning really did the trick.

Now, if I were going to serve this to company, I would probably butter the toast. Between a bit of runny yolk and the awesome flavors of the egg and the bell pepper, I didn’t miss it; I just think the extra bit of flavor would really step things up for guests.  Also, if you’re feeding folks with strong appetites (especially at dinner), be warned that Dr. O ate three of these.  He’s a machine.

Hope you try the recipe and enjoy!

TIPS:  I was surprised to see that the recipe recommended cooking the eggs over medium-high heat.  I’m used to cooking them over medium-low to medium heat for tenderness.  Everything worked out well with the recipe, though, so I’ll go with the higher heat setting when I make eggs this particular way.

Recipe link: Bell Pepper Egg-In-A-Hole




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